Mark “Gizmo” Grayson – San Luis Obispo

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Most people call Mark Grayson by his nickname, “Gizmo.” A gizmo, Mark explained to me, is different than a widget. He pointed to the rack on top of one of his gleaming silver panel vans (which he artfully refers to as “the toaster”), explaining, “that’s a widget.” If I understood correctly, widgets don’t have moving parts, but gizmos do.

Mark has spent most of career as a fabricator, designing and building gizmos and widgets for the less handy among us. His shop is packed to the brim with projects that include a retro Datsun and about a bazillion bicycles in all shapes and sizes.

If you’ve been to SLO’s famous Thursday night Bike Happening, where local cyclists ride nighttime laps around downtown SLO, then you’ve seen the kind of extreme-cycling design that Gizmo revels in. Riders in the Bike Happening show off everything from stock road bikes and cruisers to vintage rigs and elaborate homemade custom jobs (including the odd unicycle and trike). In addition to the bicycles themselves, the Bike Happening also reflects the fruit of Gizmo’s social and cultural influence in SLO – the monthly event is the evolution of a tradition that Gizmo helped start over fifteen years ago, with just a few dozen friends riding the same circuit through downtown SLO following the Thursday night Farmer’s Market. From these humble (but optimistic beginnings) the Bike Happening has grown to a massive “rain-doesn’t-cancel” event with hundreds of riders, most of whom dress in costume associated with the monthly theme. If you haven’t seen it, it’s a sight to behold, and if you haven’t ridden in it, it’s the Happening of a lifetime.

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Bersbach Holiday Card 2016

Bersbach Holiday Card 2016

This year Brittany and I travelled further down the rabbit hole of questionable Christmas card choices. And if it wasn’t already, I think three years in a row officially makes this a tradition. If you’ve visited Awkward Family Photos, then the inspiration for this year’s card is pretty obvious. If you haven’t, then we just look like crazy cat people. (And honestly, that’s fine by me.)

For the purpose of maintaining the historical record, here are our cards from 2014 and 2015.

Merry Christmas, Happy Holidays, and have an excellent 2016!

Victoria Carranza – San Luis Obispo

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Victoria Carranza is the Chief Business Development Officer at One Cool Earth, a SLO-area nonprofit that supports outdoor education, neighborhood gardens and community tree plantings. I met Victoria through Rory Aronson, who I photographed last month. When Rory told me about Victoria’s work with One Cool Earth I was interested in meeting her, but when he told me about Victoria’s other current project, I knew for sure that she’d make a great photographic subject – Victoria and her husband-to-be Brian are building a Tiny Home.

Tiny Homes are small houses sized to fit on a trailer. That means they’re usually not more than about 8 1/2 feet wide and 20 feet long. With housing continuing to get more and more expensive in San Luis Obispo, it’s easy to see the appeal of something small, simple, and affordable. Victoria and Brian are building their Tiny Home in Nipomo, where her family has made some space for them to work. However, building their Tiny Home on a trailer means that, when it’s finished, home can be just about wherever they’d like it to be.

While we were working on these photographs, Victoria walked me through their home-in-progress, and talked about the process of getting rid of the years of accumulated “stuff” that won’t fit in their new home, and coming to terms with the fact that most of that stuff isn’t really necessary in the first place. She even said that she’s bonded with her grandmother over it, since her grandmother is going through the same process of simplification in her golden years.

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Rory Aronson – San Luis Obispo

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I’ve known Rory Aronson for quite a while – originally through SLO Op Climbing (our local community bouldering gym), and later through his involvement with the Board of Directors of the SLO MakerSpace. Rory has a way of getting himself involved in community-based, sometimes somewhat counter-cultural projects. His current project is FarmBot, an open source, web controlled farming machine designed to optimize small-scale urban farming and empower more people to start growing their own food. Using technology to manage farming isn’t a new idea, but so far it’s been limited mostly to large-scale, industrial agriculture. The rest of us work mostly with hand trowels and kneepads, learning when to sow our seeds, water our sprouts, and harvest our food from books, blogs, and homemade YouTube videos. Rory’s goal with FarmBot is to bring the same kinds of precision tools used by big business to small scale home gardeners.

To learn more about FarmBot, which will be having a Kickstarter to raise funds in the near future, check out Rory’s FarmBot website , as well as the FarmBot Wiki that Rory developed to organize documentation, schematics, assembly guides, troubleshooting tips, and all kinds of other info for the FarmBot project.

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Both of these images were made on medium format film (Portra 160) using my Hasselblad V-series camera. The film was processed by the wonderful Richard Photo Lab in Valencia, CA.

Bill Ostrander – San Luis Obispo

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A couple years ago I photographed Bill Ostrander for SLO Life Magazine. At the time, Bill was preparing for the Citizen’s Congress 2014, a national gathering of legislators, scholars, and public advocacy groups to combat the influence of money in American politics. Bill runs Citizen’s Congress, a non-partisan, non-profit organization dedicated to eliminating corruption in politics, and now, continuing in this work, Bill is running for Congress in the 24th Congressional District, which includes all of San Luis Obispo County and Santa Barbara County. I photographed Bill at his ranch in the Los Osos Valley.

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We made these images on medium format film using my Hasselblad. The film was processed by Richard Photo Lab in Valencia, CA.