March for Our Lives - San Luis Obispo

On March 24 over 7,000 people gathered in Mitchell Park in support support of common sense gun law reform and school safety. We had the honor to listen to inspiring, tragic, powerful speeches by local students from all around the County. You can read the words of the students who spoke at the rally here. For me, this moment from Rosella Apel, a senior at Nipomo High School, captured the somber but resolute tone of the day:

The gun violence epidemic which has overtaken our country is a product of a culture which is, in part, complicit with violence. It does a disservice to our family members, friends, coworkers and neighbors who have perished at the hands of misused firearms to focus on only one facet of the issue. It is so much easier to ignore the fact that the systems we have in place do little to teach people that no matter how deep the pain they experience, violence is not the solution. The transformation that will be necessary to soften our societal bent towards brutality must come from all sides. We, as activists and people who care deeply about the sanctity of life, must protect it, not only through laws but through behavior and action. Cesar Chavez once said that in some cases non-violence requires more militancy than violence. In effect, we must want peace and safety just as much as others want to guard against infringements on their freedoms. If we can show that violence is not OK in our schools because it is not OK in our streets or our prisons, not OK in our international relationships or our personal interactions with one another, we begin to challenge that widespread societal apathy towards something inherently devoid of morality, the act of taking of another human’s life.

Below are some images I took at the rally in Mitchell Park and along the march through downtown San Luis Obispo.

If you've had enough too, consider making a donatation to the March for Our Lives Action Fund, or other deserving groups, such as Moms Demand Action, Everytown for Gun Safety, or the Brady Campaign.

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Elliott Hunter - San Luis Obispo

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I first learned of Elliott, a young local magician, after reading a couple recent profiles about his accomplishments in the SLO Tribune. Elliot's studying mechanical engineering at Cal Poly, a field that's not known for leaving students with tons of free time. But in spite of his school schedule (which also includes competing as a swimmer and triathlete), he performs locally, on- and off-campus, as well as monthly at the Magic Castle in Los Angeles.

Considering all these obligations, I really apprecaited Elliott's willingness to share some of his limited time with me to make these portraits.

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These photographs were all made on medium format film (Kodak Portra 160) using my Hasselblad 500cm. The film was processed by the wonderful Richard Photo Lab in Valencia, CA. The second image is a composite of two seperate frames.

Bersbach Holiday Card 2017

In contrast to last year's card, which we made in an uncharacteristically fly-by-the-seat-of-our-pants manner, this year's card was planned well in advance. Notwithstanding the need for a quick side-trip to Target to buy some props on our way up to Bishop's Peak, we had the composition of the card fully sketched-out, as well as all the logistics that would be required to get both Brittany and I - as well as all of our climbing and photography equipment - up the wall and in position for the photo (this last bit was my job).

Our car-to-car time to make this picture was north of three hours, but I think the results justify the effort. Plus I got a cool new pair of shoes out of the deal.

Happy holidays and a very happy new year!

Alec & Artoo - Cal Poly San Luis Obispo Mechanical Engineering

I photographed Alec Bialek's ongoing five-year project - a screen-accurate R2-D2 replica - last year, when it was still a work in progress. Over the past several months Alec has been finishing up the build, including the lower portion of Artoo's cylindrical body, the feet, and a gorgeous weathering job that dates this Artoo to the final act of The Empire Strikes Back (having recently taken a dip in the Dagobah swamps). Alec wanted some images that document the culmination of his work, before Artoo gets packed up and shipped off to Sweden, where Alec will be working with supercar maker Koenigsegg (I know, I can't pronounce it either).

I think he did a pretty good job; don't you agree?

Film processed and scanned by Richard Photo Lab.

Ryan - San Luis Obispo

Ryan is a friend of mine, and a classy gentleman. He generously offered his time to help me test some equipment, and these are the result. The bottom "behind the scenes" image was made using a new (to me) and very different hunk of metal, plastic, and gears called the Hasselblad SuperWide Camera (SWC). It's a weird and gorgeous piece of equipment that I'm looking forward to experimenting further with.

Women's March - San Luis Obispo

On January 21st I went with my wife to the San Luis Obispo Women's March in support of women, racial and religious minorities, the LGBTQ community and others who feel threatened by President Trump's incoming administration. I brought my Hasselblad SuperWide with me, which seemed a good choice to take in the crowds. These are five of the images I took that morning at Mitchell Park and along the one-mile loop through downtown San Luis Obispo.

Bersbach Holiday Card 2016

This year's Bersbach holiday card started as a simple travel-based beach photo with our camper truck (R.I.P. Rocinante v1.0), but quickly evolved into an homage to this year's mobile gaming phenomenon Pokemon GO. This is the first Bersbach holiday card that wasn't fully-concepted before we shot it, and I'll admit that pulling it together was a bit more of a seat-of-our pants endeavor than I would have liked. But the good news is that in the final hustle to finish the card we came up with several ideas that are now on deck for upcoming holiday seasons.

But that's for next year. For now, a Merry Christmas, Happy Hanukkah, and revelrous Festivus to everyone! See you in 2017!

Reese Galido - San Luis Obispo

Reese (1 of 2) Reese Galido is the lead singer of the Reese Galido Trio and The Kicks. I met Reese for the first time at a bonfire in Avila Beach at least six or seven years ago. We talked about our shared love of Scotch whisky and I'm not sure what else. When I got back in touch with Reese earlier this year to see if she would sit for a portrait, I wasn't actually sure if she'd remember that we'd met before. Fortunately for me she did, and she generously invited me to her home in downtown San Luis to shoot. (Also I got to meet her rabbit, Bunzo.)

The images below were made at the Steynberg Gallery in SLO, where Reese performed for the release of her most recent album, Unraveled. You can hear a bunch of Reese's music for free here, and you can pick up a copy of Unraveled here (or on Internet-places like iTunes).

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These photographs were all made on medium format film (Kodak Portra 160) using my Hasselblad 500cm. The film was processed by the wonderful Richard Photo Lab in Valencia, CA.

R2-D2 - Cal Poly San Luis Obispo Mechanical Engineering

Most of my images involve people. Until very recently, I don't think I'd ever photographed anything that you'd call a "robot." So even though R2-D2 (or "Artoo") may be an iconic character from one of the most famous science fiction stories of all time, he’s definitely outside the realm of my usual subject matter. Take my word for it though, when you meet him in person, he's at least as expressive as most of the humans I know. R2-D2 (3 of 6)

So how did I get access to this little blue guy? Well, among TV and movie watchers there’s a subset of fans who want a more visceral connection to a story than simply watching it unfold on a screen. Places like the Replica Prop Forum and the R2-D2 Builder’s Club cater to these fans, offering them a like-minded community of enthusiasts, instructions, encouragement, and even access to limited runs of custom-made difficult-to-find components. This droid’s builder, Alec Bialek, is a mechanical engineering student at Cal Poly San Luis Obispo. Alec takes his Artoo to events like the premier of The Force Awakens at SLO's historic Fremont Theater, giving fans a chance to meet the famous droid in person. After seeing photos of Artoo at a recent school fundraiser, I contacted Alec, and he generously granted me an exclusive one-on-one to meet Artoo and make something along the lines of a 'portrait of an astromech droid.'

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Alec’s Artoo isn’t completely finished yet - Alec is still working on the feet and the base of the body - which is why I mostly photographed Artoo from the "waist" up. When those last pieces are done, Alec is planning to weather Artoo so he looks a little more battle-worn, consistent with his appearance in the films.

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The interesting part of making these images, at least for me, was exploring the space between portraiture and still life. Even in the Star Wars universe, Artoo isn't quite a living thing, yet somehow he's imbued with a very strong sense of agency and personality. That sense is borne partially from the puppetry and sound effects that you experience when you watch the film (or, if you're lucky like me, when Alec fires up his remote control and has Artoo run circles around you while tweeting & whistling). But it also has a lot to do with Artoo's basic visual design. He's hardly anthropomorphic, but when his big, black, glassy eye is pointed in your direction, it's hard not to feel like you're being seen.

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That sense is what I tried to capture in these last two images, and what I would very much like to capture with other similar subjects. If anybody reading this happens to know someone who's built other character droids from popular sci-fi - such as WALL-E, Johnny Five, Marvin, Bender, H.E.L.P.e.R. or others, please don't hesitate to share this post with them, and have them drop me a line.

Mark "Gizmo" Grayson - San Luis Obispo

Gizmo (1 of 2) Most people call Mark Grayson by his nickname, “Gizmo.” A gizmo, Mark explained to me, is different than a widget. He pointed to the rack on top of one of his gleaming silver panel vans (which he artfully refers to as “the toaster”), explaining, “that’s a widget.” If I understood correctly, widgets don't have moving parts, but gizmos do.

Mark has spent most of career as a fabricator, designing and building gizmos and widgets for the less handy among us. His shop is packed to the brim with projects that include a retro Datsun and about a bazillion bicycles in all shapes and sizes.

If you’ve been to SLO’s famous Thursday night Bike Happening, where local cyclists ride nighttime laps around downtown SLO, then you’ve seen the kind of extreme-cycling design that Gizmo revels in. Riders in the Bike Happening show off everything from stock road bikes and cruisers to vintage rigs and elaborate homemade custom jobs (including the odd unicycle and trike). In addition to the bicycles themselves, the Bike Happening also reflects the fruit of Gizmo’s social and cultural influence in SLO – the monthly event is the evolution of a tradition that Gizmo helped start over fifteen years ago, with just a few dozen friends riding the same circuit through downtown SLO following the Thursday night Farmer’s Market. From these humble (but optimistic beginnings) the Bike Happening has grown to a massive "rain-doesn't-cancel" event with hundreds of riders, most of whom dress in costume associated with the monthly theme. If you haven't seen it, it's a sight to behold, and if you haven't ridden in it, it's the Happening of a lifetime.

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Bersbach Holiday Card 2015

Bersbach Holiday Card 2016 This year Brittany and I travelled further down the rabbit hole of questionable Christmas card choices. And if it wasn't already, I think three years in a row officially makes this a tradition. If you've visited Awkward Family Photos, then the inspiration for this year's card is pretty obvious. If you haven't, then we just look like crazy cat people. (And honestly, that's fine by me.)

For the purpose of maintaining the historical record, here are our cards from 2014 and 2015.

Merry Christmas, Happy Holidays, and have an excellent 2016!

Victoria Carranza - San Luis Obispo

Carranza (1 of 2) Victoria Carranza is the Chief Business Development Officer at One Cool Earth, a SLO-area nonprofit that supports outdoor education, neighborhood gardens and community tree plantings. I met Victoria through Rory Aronson, who I photographed last month. When Rory told me about Victoria's work with One Cool Earth I was interested in meeting her, but when he told me about Victoria's other current project, I knew for sure that she'd make a great photographic subject - Victoria and her husband-to-be Brian are building a Tiny Home.

Tiny Homes are small houses sized to fit on a trailer. That means they're usually not more than about 8 1/2 feet wide and 20 feet long. With housing continuing to get more and more expensive in San Luis Obispo, it's easy to see the appeal of something small, simple, and affordable. Victoria and Brian are building their Tiny Home in Nipomo, where her family has made some space for them to work. However, building their Tiny Home on a trailer means that, when it's finished, home can be just about wherever they'd like it to be.

While we were working on these photographs, Victoria walked me through their home-in-progress, and talked about the process of getting rid of the years of accumulated "stuff" that won't fit in their new home, and coming to terms with the fact that most of that stuff isn't really necessary in the first place. She even said that she's bonded with her grandmother over it, since her grandmother is going through the same process of simplification in her golden years.

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Bill Ostrander - San Luis Obispo

Ostrander (1 of 2) A couple years ago I photographed Bill Ostrander for SLO Life Magazine. At the time, Bill was preparing for the Citizen's Congress 2014, a national gathering of legislators, scholars, and public advocacy groups to combat the influence of money in American politics. Bill runs Citizen's Congress, a non-partisan, non-profit organization dedicated to eliminating corruption in politics, and now, continuing in this work, Bill is running for Congress in the 24th Congressional District, which includes all of San Luis Obispo County and Santa Barbara County. I photographed Bill at his ranch in the Los Osos Valley.

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We made these images on medium format film using my Hasselblad. The film was processed by Richard Photo Lab in Valencia, CA.

Clint Slaughter - San Luis Obispo

Clint Slaughter (1 of 2) I first photographed Clint Slaughter in early 2014 for the SLO MakerSpace. Clint's a friend, and was one of the first people I thought of when I started working on a new independent portrait project about especially interesting members of the San Luis Obispo community. Clint is the driving force behind the SLO MakerSpace, and serves on the MakerSpace Board of Directors as Chief Executive Officer. The MakerSpace is a collaborative machine, wood, electronics, and textile shop where community members come to work on all kinds of projects, take classes, and network with other local makers. As if that wasn't enough, Clint is also an emergency physician at French Hospital in San Luis Obispo and Arroyo Grande Hospital.

(Yes, he's "Dr. Slaughter." And no, I could not have made that up.)

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Both of these photographs of Clint were made at the MakerSpace on medium format film using my Hasselblad. The film was processed by the always brilliant Richard Photo Lab in Valencia, CA.

Lesley Santos Dierks - SLO Life Magazine

Lesley Santos Dierks 2 Lesley is the CEO of Spokes, a San Luis Obispo organization that provides management training and other resources to local non profits, to help them succeed and better serve the community. I photographed Lesley in her home for the cover of the latest issue of SLO Life Magazine, which just came out at the beginning of December. This was the first set of images that I've delivered to the magazine that was entirely shot on film. I always carry my digital gear for backup on these shoots, and usually deliver at least some images from the digital rig, since it allows me to move faster and get some coverage that my Hasselblad isn't fast enough to keep up with; however, for this shoot Lesley so patient that I was able to get full coverage on a single roll of 220 film - just 24 frames!

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Thanks, as usual, to Richard Photo Lab for handling my film marvelously.

Why Film? And Why Medium Format?

For every cover of SLO Life that I shoot, Tom (the editor of the magazine) asks me to write a couple short paragraphs about the portrait session. The first time Tom included this small write-up in the magazine was when I started shooting the covers using my old analog Hasselblad, rather than my digital gear. As a result, when writing these pieces, I've often discussed the process of shooting film, thinking that it may be interesting to older readers who remember being limited to a mere 36 exposures per roll, or to younger readers who've grown up accustomed to the instant feedback of digital photography. What I haven't written about is why I choose to shoot film. The answer is simple but can easily get complicated... I shoot film so that I can shoot medium format.

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I'll spare you the plodding explanation of different film/sensor formats. There's plenty of that kind of thing on the web already, and trust me when I say that most of it is tremendously boring. Pretty much all you need to know is that most digital camera sensors are small, but medium format film is big. Is there bigger film than medium format? Oh yeah. Are there also bigger digital sensors? Yup. But if we're limiting ourselves cameras that you can carry around relatively easily, and can afford to buy without a taking out second mortgage, the formula holds true: film = big, digital sensors = small.

Why does that matter? Physics.

The bigger your film plane - whether it's a digital sensor or a piece of chemical emulsion - the faster things go from sharp where the camera is focused to blurry where it's not. Have you noticed how, when you take a picture with your cellphone or a compact camera, pretty much everything is in focus, whether it's close to the lens or in the background? That's because the sensor is tiny. Sometimes you want to have everything in focus, but sometimes you don't. Bigger digital cameras with bigger sensors than your cellphone let you make this choice to a degree, but with medium formal film, the focus falls off from sharp to blurry very fast. In these portraits of Eric Meyer, my camera is focused on Eric's eyes, and you can see that they're tack-sharp, along with his nose and mouth, which are all about the same distance from the camera as his eyes. But even just a tiny bit further from the lens the focus falls off, and things get softer and softer as they recede into the background.

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When I look at these pictures, I really lock in on Eric's eyes and his expression, because they're super sharp. Anything that might be distracting is quite soft, so it doesn't pull attention away from the center of his face. For me, the effect that I get using medium format film for a close headshot like this evokes a sense of sitting across from a person, having an intimate conversation with them. That sense of intimacy is a critical part of why these pictures work for me, and why I enjoy working with medium format film.

Stephanie Burchiel - SLO Life Magazine

Stephanie Burchiel 2 The cover of the August/September SLO Life Magazine is Stephanie Burchiel. Stephanie has been offering her vegan soups at farmer's markets throughout San Luis Obispo County for almost six years, and just released a cookbook featuring her recipes through Farmer's Market Publishing. She also almost never stops smiling.

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Stephanie and I met at her parent's ranch, deep in the coastal hills above Cayucos, so that we could take advantage of the ranch's wooded scenery for some of the images. As usual, the images for the magazine were shot on Portra 160 film with my Hasselblad, and processed at Richard Photo Lab in Los Angeles.

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Bill Ostrander - SLO Life Magazine

Bill Ostrander 1 Bill Ostrander is the director of the 2014 Citizens' Congress, a national gathering of legislators, academics, and advocacy groups working to combat the influence of money in politics. Bill was featured in this month's SLO Life Magazine, and the images above and below are a couple that I especially liked from our cover shoot.

The cover session was shot on Portra 160 film in my Hasselblad, and processed at Richard Photo Lab in Los Angeles.

 

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Bill is also a rancher, growing hay and raising cattle on his ranch in the hills above Los Osos Valley, and was generous enough to show me around his ranch for a few outdoor images.

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Terri Kurczewski - SLO Life Magazine

Terri Kurczewski 1 Most regular folks don't necessarily enjoy the process of being photographed. Terri Kurczewski is no exception, but it was her turn to grace the cover of this April's SLO Life, and it was my pleasure to meet her and photograph her for the magazine. Terri runs the Child Development Resource Center of the Central Coast (CRDC) as well as the Sm(ART) Studio, a community art studio, gallery, and classroom that benefits the CRDC.

Terri and I worked through a number of different scenarios, to see what might work best in the magazine, including some images of her in the Sm(ART) Studio, an outdoor setting with a small studio backdrop behind her head, and even an off-the-wall idea where glitter was raining down on her from above. But in the end, my favorite were these simple portraits on white, shot for the magazine cover. The final image that ran on the cover  was made with one of my digital cameras, but these frames - from the two rolls of film that I ran through my Hasselblad that afternoon and developed at Richard Photo Lab in Los Angeles -  are my favorites.

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